Project 365 Tiruvannamalai

Around the hill / Photography (C) Thierry Cardon / Project 365 public photo archive Tiruvannamalai
Around the hill / Photography (C) Thierry Cardon / Project 365 public photo archive Tiruvannamalai

 

Title: Around the Hill
Photographer: Thierry Cardon
Medium and format: 35mm analogue palladium print
Year: 2014 / 2015
Courtesy: EtP Project 365 public photo archive

EtP PROJECT 365

Collectively creating and preserving photographic visuals of the fast vanishing landscape, divergent customs, pluralistic culture and diversified Dravidian society of ancient Tamilakam, a region comprising modern Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh and Puducherry.

இ. டி. பி. ப்ராஜெக்ட் 365
அதி வேகமாய் மாறி வருகின்ற நவீன தமிழ்நாடு, கேரளம், புதுச்சேரி, கர்நாடக மற்றும் ஆந்திர மாநிலங்களை உள்ளடக்கிய பண்டைத் தமிழகத்தின் சமகால வாழ்வுமுறையையும், கலாச்சாரத்தையும், பன்முகத்தன்மை வாய்ந்த திராவிட சமூகத்தையும் புகைப்பட பதிவுகளாக பாதுகாக்கும் ஒரு பொதுமை புகைப்படக்கலை திட்டமே ப்ராஜெக்ட் 365.

EtP പ്രൊജക്റ്റ് 365
അതിവേഗം മാറ്റങ്ങൾക്ക് വിധേയമായിക്കൊണ്ടിരിക്കുന്ന ആധുനിക കേരളം, തമിഴ് നാട്, കർണാടകം, പുതുച്ചേരി, ആന്ധ്രയുടെ ചില ഭാഗങ്ങൾ എന്നിവ ഉൾപെടുന്ന സംഘകാല തമിഴകം പ്രദേശത്തിലെ സമകാലിക ജീവിതരീതികളും നിലനില്കുന്ന സംസ്കാരവും വൈവിധ്യമുള്ള ദ്രാവിഡവേരുകളുള്ള സമൂഹവും കേന്ദ്രീകരിച്ച്‌ ഫോട്ടോ ദൃശ്യഭിംഭങ്ങൾ സൃഷ്ടിക്കാൻ ശ്രമിക്കുന്ന ഒരു പൊതു സാംസ്‌കാരിക കൂട്ടായ്മയാണ് പ്രൊജക്റ്റ്‌ 365.

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Project 365 Tiruvannamalai

Director's anecdote / Photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Project 365 public photo archive Tiruvannamalai
Director’s anecdote / Photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Project 365 public photo archive Tiruvannamalai

 

Title: Director’s anecdote
Photographer: Abul kalam azad
Medium and format: 35mm Digital
Year: 2014 / 2015
Courtesy: EtP Project 365 public photo archive

EtP PROJECT 365

Collectively creating and preserving photographic visuals of the fast vanishing landscape, divergent customs, pluralistic culture and diversified Dravidian society of ancient Tamilakam, a region comprising modern Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh and Puducherry.

இ. டி. பி. ப்ராஜெக்ட் 365
அதி வேகமாய் மாறி வருகின்ற நவீன தமிழ்நாடு, கேரளம், புதுச்சேரி, கர்நாடக மற்றும் ஆந்திர மாநிலங்களை உள்ளடக்கிய பண்டைத் தமிழகத்தின் சமகால வாழ்வுமுறையையும், கலாச்சாரத்தையும், பன்முகத்தன்மை வாய்ந்த திராவிட சமூகத்தையும் புகைப்பட பதிவுகளாக பாதுகாக்கும் ஒரு பொதுமை புகைப்படக்கலை திட்டமே ப்ராஜெக்ட் 365.

EtP പ്രൊജക്റ്റ് 365
അതിവേഗം മാറ്റങ്ങൾക്ക് വിധേയമായിക്കൊണ്ടിരിക്കുന്ന ആധുനിക കേരളം, തമിഴ് നാട്, കർണാടകം, പുതുച്ചേരി, ആന്ധ്രയുടെ ചില ഭാഗങ്ങൾ എന്നിവ ഉൾപെടുന്ന സംഘകാല തമിഴകം പ്രദേശത്തിലെ സമകാലിക ജീവിതരീതികളും നിലനില്കുന്ന സംസ്കാരവും വൈവിധ്യമുള്ള ദ്രാവിഡവേരുകളുള്ള സമൂഹവും കേന്ദ്രീകരിച്ച്‌ ഫോട്ടോ ദൃശ്യഭിംഭങ്ങൾ സൃഷ്ടിക്കാൻ ശ്രമിക്കുന്ന ഒരു പൊതു സാംസ്‌കാരിക കൂട്ടായ്മയാണ് പ്രൊജക്റ്റ്‌ 365.

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Close encounters: 365days myopic view

{ Essay on photography by Arjun Ramachandran, a media student with interests in cinema and photography. 365 days myopic is a smart phone photographic series done by photographer Abul Kalam Azad, as a contribution to Project 365 public photo archive Tiruvannamalai. In this unique, expansive body of work Abul records the everyday life in the ancient town, Tiruvannamalai. Abul is the Director of Project 365, and co-founder of Ekalokam Trust for Photography.}

Since the advent of digital technology and its fast growth, we have been carelessly misplacing or erasing much of the images we produce, “safely” storing them in the long forgotten floppy discs, CD drives, USB drives, old mobile phones, cameras etc. Photography, which is essentially a print, has been stripped of its traditional alchemical quality and longevity, and has almost completely become mere virtual intangible images. While this digitization has undoubtedly democratised the medium and stretched the horizons of thought of its practitioners, the danger is, in an instant, the innumerable casual-yet-valuable images that are being made can be lost forever to our future generations.

Digital recording is, largely, mere magnetisation of a material or optical marks made on a surface. The unwanted and untrue connotation that the word “digital” has acquired is that it is only presentable on a screen; “digital” only really means quantised, non-continuous data. On the basis of this misunderstanding, we have been storing digital images for the purpose of virtual viewing alone and by nature, digital recording is much more vulnerable to damage compared to analogue (read continuous) recording. A stray magnetic field is enough to wipe out a hard disk.

Even though several thousand photographs are being taken every day, by nearly everyone, only a very few provide thoughtful and focused efforts to preserve these photographs like yesteryear epigraphical documentation or other iconographic motifs for the benefit of future generations. This is as much an effect of seeming unnecessity and non-viability as it is of gross negligence. Documents are only valuable for those who see a use for it many years down the line, and not for those who do not intend to pay a second thought to the matter. Smart phone photographs, therefore, seem trivial and replicable for the majority of the authors and as such, irrelevant. These photographs may not be printable in larger formats, may not be commercially viable, but in an archive, they serve well the intended purpose – a visual document of ordinary people and their everyday life in an ancient town.


Abul Kalam Azad has been making smart phone photographs as connecting anecdotes for project 365. He has created several hundred lo-fi images depicting the life and culture of this ancient town, recording routine or chance meetings, casual events or details of his own daily life. Project 365 public photo archives will be locally preserving these images for public access and research. Setting aside his expertise in analogue & experimental photographic works and after traversing through digital, painted, manipulated images, Abul has consciously shifted to smart phone image making in a bid to utilise its nuances.


Smart phone images readily seem to bring in an element of autobiography. The daily events are most often captured through them, almost always in a moment of subconscious composition and judgement. There is a lack of formality or any veil of pretention that a bulky professional camera might induce even though the pretentions and mannerisms of the “real world” remain intact, as the smart phone remains nearly invisible between the subject and the artist. Even in staged portraits captured on smart phones, the posture of the subject becomes much freer. The smart phone becomes something of a non-intervening observer, not affecting the system at all.

The myopic eye of smart phone demands that the photographer has to be within a certain “intimate” distance to take a photograph. There has to be a certain connection between the one who is being photographed and the photographer himself – using a smart phone to create portraits of people means that the photographer is not a mere witness; the one who is photographed often looks straight into the camera and thus, at the photographer. A reflection of the effect of eye contact between the photographer and the subject is captured in the portrait.


This presence of intimacy is what a spectator relates to in these images. As personal spaces become increasingly reserved and physical contact becomes restricted in a wave of conservative urban-elite influence, this welcome intrusion of a nonprofessional-appearing, smart-phone-wielding photographer into touching distances of the subject is a reminder of the extent of simplicity and freedom in human relationships.

Disclaimer: Photographs and text published in this post is copyrighted property of the author. Prior permission is required from the author for republishing and reprinting. For more information, contact Ekalokam Trust for Photography at admin@etpindia.org

Legendary Photographers – Eliot Elisofon (1911 – 1973)

Eliot
Since tri-sangam period, Tiruvannamalai had been a preferred destination for creative people from various traditions and the Annamalai hill in this historical town has found mention in many Sangam period literatures. The light, landscape and people of the sacred hill and its surroundings attracted many photographers to document this town. The earliest known photograph of Tiruvannamalai was taken in the year 1880. During the late 1940s Life TIME Magazine had sent noted American commercial / documentary photographer Eliot Elisofon on an assignment to document the Annamalai (Arunachaleshwarar) temple in Tiruvannamalai.

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Eliot Elisofon, (1911 – 1973) was an internationally known photographer, filmmaker, author, artist, and art collector. He started as a commercial photographer in 1935 but soon after developed an interest in photography as social documentary and decided to devote his career to photojournalism. He joined Life TIME magazine in 1942 as a war photographer-correspondent and worked on staff or freelance for the magazine until it ceased publication in 1972. After the war he worked on large geographical photo features in the United States and around the world. He was appointed a research fellow in primitive art at Harvard University in 1958 and was a member of the Harvard Peabody Museum’s 1961 expedition to film tribal life in New Guinea. He published more than 20 books, made documentary films, wrote numerous scholarly articles, and was a founding trustee of the Museum of African Art in Washington, D.C. He died in the year 1973.

Photography (C) Eliot Elisofon
Photography (C) Eliot Elisofon
Photography (C) Eliot Elisofon
Photography (C) Eliot Elisofon

Eliot’s assignment in India was to depict the art and ancient rock cut architecture of Hindu and Buddhist temples at various locations in India, including cave temples at Ellora, Ajanta, Elephanta Island, and Māmallapuram; Lingaraj and other temples of the Hindu god Siva in the temple city Bhubaneswar; the Sun Temple of Konārak and Arunachaleshwara Temple in Tiruvannāmalai. He had made several photographs of Tiruvannamalai, the Annamalai (Arunachaleshwar Temple) and Sri Ramana at his Ashram. Eliot’s photographs on Tiruvannamalai was published on 30th May 1949, the article was titled “Holy Man”, written by Winthrop Sergeant.
Click this link for the full article:
https://books.google.co.in/books?id=1k4EAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA92&dq=ramana+maharshi&hl=en&ei=iQ4tTbGSFcH-8Ab53eiDCQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=ramana%20maharshi&f=false

Disclaimer: Images (C) Eliot Elisofon / Time LIFE magaziine archive. Text research Tulsi Swarna Lakshmi / Ekalokam Trust for Photography

 

Legendary photographers: PRS Mani Iyer

PRS Mani Iyer

PRS is not known in the contemporary photography world. However, his famous photo of Sage Ramana titled ‘Mani bust’ taken during the 1930s, continue to be circulated and worshiped by several thousand devotees.

PRS Mani was born at the turn of the 18th century as the first son to the couple Ramaseha Iyer and Sivasankari who hailed from Pattamadai, a village in South Tamil Nadu. After his Honour’s degree in Arts, Subramanian took to professional photography and joined the then famous Modern Theatre of Salem as an executive photographer. Modern Theatres Ltd. was a motion picture movie studio in Salem, Tamil Nadu India started by Thiruchengodu Ramalingam Sundaram (aka TRS) in 1935. The early South Indian Cinema headquarters was based in Salem and this sophisticated studio produced over more than 150 movies until 1982. Modern Theaters was situated in the outskirts of Salem – Yercaud road, which is currently in ruins. Only later the Tamil Cinema base had moved to Chennai. Several of PRS’s promotional photographs of eminent actors, actresses and artists taken during his time at the Modern Theaters are lost to the contemporary photography world.

ModernTheatersLtd-Logo

During the 1930s, N.R. Krishnamurti Iyer was asked by the Ramana ashram Sarvadhikari to send photographs of Nataraja, the majestic idol in the Meenakshi temple, in front of whom the boy Ramana stood for long spells of time, shedding copious tears of ecstasy, before he left Madurai for good. He also wanted a photograph of the house where Ramana was born in Tiruchuzhi and of some other places there. These were meant to be placed in the Tamil biography Sri Ramana Vijayam by Suddhananda Bharati . N.R.Krishnamurti Iyer brought P.R.S.Mani who was his student and an expert photographer. Ramana used to call him Mani and he spent almost 14 years under the loving care of Ramana. Mani married the daughter of Ganapati Sastri, Tiruvannamalai. He died at the young age of 33 years.

Photography (C) PRS Mani Iyer / Ramana Ashram Archives
Photography (C) PRS Mani / Ramana Ashram Archive
PRS Mani 1
photography (C) PRS Mani / Ramana Ashram Archive

During the short span of his photographic career, he made several marvelous images of the Sage Ramana, especially during the Skandasramam days and many other historical photographs of the town as well. There is very limited information about Mani and his contribution during his time with modern theatre is unknown till now. If one starts digging they will find marvelous images of those early South Indian cinema days taken by this photographer.

Text research by Tulsi / Ekalokam Trust for Photography. Photography © P.R.S. Mani / Ramana Ashram archives.

 

 

Project 365 Tiruvannamalai

Collectively creating and preserving photographic visuals of the fast vanishing landscape, divergent customs, pluralistic culture and diversified Dravidian society of ancient Tamilakam, a region comprising modern Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh and Puducherry.

Title: Colors of Tiruvannamalai
Photographer: Dinesh Khanna
Medium and format: Digital
Year: 2014 / 2015
Courtesy: EtP Project 365 public photo archive

EtP PROJECT 365

Collectively creating and preserving photographic visuals of the fast vanishing landscape, divergent customs, pluralistic culture and diversified Dravidian society of ancient Tamilakam, a region comprising modern Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh and Puducherry.

இ. டி. பி. ப்ராஜெக்ட் 365
அதி வேகமாய் மாறி வருகின்ற நவீன தமிழ்நாடு, கேரளம், புதுச்சேரி, கர்நாடக மற்றும் ஆந்திர மாநிலங்களை உள்ளடக்கிய பண்டைத் தமிழகத்தின் சமகால வாழ்வுமுறையையும், கலாச்சாரத்தையும், பன்முகத்தன்மை வாய்ந்த திராவிட சமூகத்தையும் புகைப்பட பதிவுகளாக பாதுகாக்கும் ஒரு பொதுமை புகைப்படக்கலை திட்டமே ப்ராஜெக்ட் 365.

EtP പ്രൊജക്റ്റ് 365
അതിവേഗം മാറ്റങ്ങൾക്ക് വിധേയമായിക്കൊണ്ടിരിക്കുന്ന ആധുനിക കേരളം, തമിഴ് നാട്, കർണാടകം, പുതുച്ചേരി, ആന്ധ്രയുടെ ചില ഭാഗങ്ങൾ എന്നിവ ഉൾപെടുന്ന സംഘകാല തമിഴകം പ്രദേശത്തിലെ സമകാലിക ജീവിതരീതികളും നിലനില്കുന്ന സംസ്കാരവും വൈവിധ്യമുള്ള ദ്രാവിഡവേരുകളുള്ള സമൂഹവും കേന്ദ്രീകരിച്ച്‌ ഫോട്ടോ ദൃശ്യഭിംഭങ്ങൾ സൃഷ്ടിക്കാൻ ശ്രമിക്കുന്ന ഒരു പൊതു സാംസ്‌കാരിക കൂട്ടായ്മയാണ് പ്രൊജക്റ്റ്‌ 365.

For more information contact EtP at project365@etpindia.org / http://www.etpindia.org

Project 365 Tiruvannamalai

Collectively creating and preserving photographic visuals of the fast vanishing landscape, divergent customs, pluralistic culture and diversified Dravidian society of ancient Tamilakam, a region comprising modern Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh and Puducherry.

Title: 360degrees ecology of ancient Annamalai Hill
Photographer: Jiby Charles
Medium: Digital
Year: 2014 / 2015
Courtesy: EtP Project 365 public photo archive

EtP PROJECT 365

Collectively creating and preserving photographic visuals of the fast vanishing landscape, divergent customs, pluralistic culture and diversified Dravidian society of ancient Tamilakam, a region comprising modern Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh and Puducherry.

இ. டி. பி. ப்ராஜெக்ட் 365
அதி வேகமாய் மாறி வருகின்ற நவீன தமிழ்நாடு, கேரளம், புதுச்சேரி, கர்நாடக மற்றும் ஆந்திர மாநிலங்களை உள்ளடக்கிய பண்டைத் தமிழகத்தின் சமகால வாழ்வுமுறையையும், கலாச்சாரத்தையும், பன்முகத்தன்மை வாய்ந்த திராவிட சமூகத்தையும் புகைப்பட பதிவுகளாக பாதுகாக்கும் ஒரு பொதுமை புகைப்படக்கலை திட்டமே ப்ராஜெக்ட் 365.

EtP പ്രൊജക്റ്റ് 365
അതിവേഗം മാറ്റങ്ങൾക്ക് വിധേയമായിക്കൊണ്ടിരിക്കുന്ന ആധുനിക കേരളം, തമിഴ് നാട്, കർണാടകം, പുതുച്ചേരി, ആന്ധ്രയുടെ ചില ഭാഗങ്ങൾ എന്നിവ ഉൾപെടുന്ന സംഘകാല തമിഴകം പ്രദേശത്തിലെ സമകാലിക ജീവിതരീതികളും നിലനില്കുന്ന സംസ്കാരവും വൈവിധ്യമുള്ള ദ്രാവിഡവേരുകളുള്ള സമൂഹവും കേന്ദ്രീകരിച്ച്‌ ഫോട്ടോ ദൃശ്യഭിംഭങ്ങൾ സൃഷ്ടിക്കാൻ ശ്രമിക്കുന്ന ഒരു പൊതു സാംസ്‌കാരിക കൂട്ടായ്മയാണ് പ്രൊജക്റ്റ്‌ 365.

For more information contact EtP at project365@etpindia.org / http://www.etpindia.org

Project 365 Tiruvannamalai

Collectively creating and preserving photographic visuals of the fast vanishing landscape, divergent customs, pluralistic culture and diversified lifestyle of an ancient Tamil town.

Title: Children of different gods
Photographer: Ami Gupta
Medium: Digital
Year: 2014 / 2015
Courtesy: EtP Project 365 public photo archive

EtP PROJECT 365

Collectively creating and preserving photographic visuals of the fast vanishing landscape, divergent customs, pluralistic culture and diversified Dravidian society of ancient Tamilakam, a region comprising modern Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh and Puducherry.

இ. டி. பி. ப்ராஜெக்ட் 365
அதி வேகமாய் மாறி வருகின்ற நவீன தமிழ்நாடு, கேரளம், புதுச்சேரி, கர்நாடக மற்றும் ஆந்திர மாநிலங்களை உள்ளடக்கிய பண்டைத் தமிழகத்தின் சமகால வாழ்வுமுறையையும், கலாச்சாரத்தையும், பன்முகத்தன்மை வாய்ந்த திராவிட சமூகத்தையும் புகைப்பட பதிவுகளாக பாதுகாக்கும் ஒரு பொதுமை புகைப்படக்கலை திட்டமே ப்ராஜெக்ட் 365.

EtP പ്രൊജക്റ്റ് 365
അതിവേഗം മാറ്റങ്ങൾക്ക് വിധേയമായിക്കൊണ്ടിരിക്കുന്ന ആധുനിക കേരളം, തമിഴ് നാട്, കർണാടകം, പുതുച്ചേരി, ആന്ധ്രയുടെ ചില ഭാഗങ്ങൾ എന്നിവ ഉൾപെടുന്ന സംഘകാല തമിഴകം പ്രദേശത്തിലെ സമകാലിക ജീവിതരീതികളും നിലനില്കുന്ന സംസ്കാരവും വൈവിധ്യമുള്ള ദ്രാവിഡവേരുകളുള്ള സമൂഹവും കേന്ദ്രീകരിച്ച്‌ ഫോട്ടോ ദൃശ്യഭിംഭങ്ങൾ സൃഷ്ടിക്കാൻ ശ്രമിക്കുന്ന ഒരു പൊതു സാംസ്‌കാരിക കൂട്ടായ്മയാണ് പ്രൊജക്റ്റ്‌ 365.

For more information contact EtP at project365@etpindia.org / http://www.etpindia.org

Collectively creating and preserving photographic visuals of the fast vanishing landscape, divergent customs, pluralistic culture and diversified lifestyle of an ancient Tamil town.

Colors of Tiruvannamalai

“There are infinite ways of seeing. But when you see the world through Dinesh Khanna’s eyes, you are overcome with an innate sense of awe, besides many other emotions. The reason perhaps is the fact that he shoots from the heart. And it’s his incredible way of juxtaposing what he sees and what he feels that creates images that stay with you forever.” – Ami Gupta, Project 365  Photographer and Editorial Team, EtP on the works of noted contemporary Indian photographer and Project 365 leading photographer

Photographer Dinesh Khanna in Tiruvannamalai / Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Project 365 public photo archives
Photographer Dinesh Khanna in Tiruvannamalai / Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Project 365 public photo archives

Dinesh Khanna had visited Tiruvannamalai during Pongal festival. Dinesh has always been fascinated by Colors. As soon as he landed in Chennai, he was captivated by colors that can been seen every where. He happily said, “Tamil Nadu and I have one thing in common – colors”. His photographic contribution to our ancient town, “Colors of Tiruvannamalai” portrays the vibrant mood of this ancient town.

Colors of Tiruvannamalai / Photography (C) Dinesh Khanna / DSLR 35mm camera / Archival pigment prints / Project 365 public photo archives
Colors of Tiruvannamalai / Photography (C) Dinesh Khanna / DSLR 35mm camera / Archival pigment prints / Project 365 public photo archives
Colors of Tiruvannamalai / Photography (C) Dinesh Khanna / DSLR 35mm camera / Archival pigment prints / Project 365 public photo archives
Colors of Tiruvannamalai / Photography (C) Dinesh Khanna / DSLR 35mm camera / Archival pigment prints / Project 365 public photo archives
Colors of Tiruvannamalai / Photography (C) Dinesh Khanna / DSLR 35mm camera / Archival pigment prints / Project 365 public photo archives
Colors of Tiruvannamalai / Photography (C) Dinesh Khanna / DSLR 35mm camera / Archival pigment prints / Project 365 public photo archives
Colors of Tiruvannamalai / Photography (C) Dinesh Khanna / DSLR 35mm camera / Archival pigment prints / Project 365 public photo archives
Colors of Tiruvannamalai / Photography (C) Dinesh Khanna / DSLR 35mm camera / Archival pigment prints / Project 365 public photo archives

Everyday life in an ancient town

Dinesh Khanna is the co-founder and managing trustee of the Nazar Foundation in Delhi, a non profit trust that promotes the art of photography through various workshops, interactions and exhibitions. Doing this is his way of sharing his passion with budding and even experienced photographers. This organization also sponsors the biennial ‘Delhi Photo Festival’ which is an incredible platform for photographers to showcase their works.

Colors of Tiruvannamalai / Photography (C) Dinesh Khanna / DSLR 35mm camera / Archival pigment prints / Project 365 public photo archives
Colors of Tiruvannamalai / Photography (C) Dinesh Khanna / DSLR 35mm camera / Archival pigment prints / Project 365 public photo archives
Colors of Tiruvannamalai / Photography (C) Dinesh Khanna / DSLR 35mm camera / Archival pigment prints / Project 365 public photo archives
Colors of Tiruvannamalai / Photography (C) Dinesh Khanna / DSLR 35mm camera / Archival pigment prints / Project 365 public photo archives
Colors of Tiruvannamalai / Photography (C) Dinesh Khanna / DSLR 35mm camera / Archival pigment prints / Project 365 public photo archives
Colors of Tiruvannamalai / Photography (C) Dinesh Khanna / DSLR 35mm camera / Archival pigment prints / Project 365 public photo archives
Colors of Tiruvannamalai / Photography (C) Dinesh Khanna / DSLR 35mm camera / Archival pigment prints / Project 365 public photo archives
Colors of Tiruvannamalai / Photography (C) Dinesh Khanna / DSLR 35mm camera / Archival pigment prints / Project 365 public photo archives
Colors of Tiruvannamalai / Photography (C) Dinesh Khanna / DSLR 35mm camera / Archival pigment prints / Project 365 public photo archives
Colors of Tiruvannamalai / Photography (C) Dinesh Khanna / DSLR 35mm camera / Archival pigment prints / Project 365 public photo archives
Colors of Tiruvannamalai / Photography (C) Dinesh Khanna / DSLR 35mm camera / Archival pigment prints / Project 365 public photo archives
Colors of Tiruvannamalai / Photography (C) Dinesh Khanna / DSLR 35mm camera / Archival pigment prints / Project 365 public photo archives

Thank you Dinesh Khanna for being part of this cultural initiative that creates and preserves photographic visuals of the fast changing culture and lifestyle of our ancient town.

Disclaimer: All rights reserved. All the images published in this blog is copyrighted property of the author (photographer) and is a part of PROJECT 365 PUBLIC ARCHIVES. Text by Tulsi Swarna Lakshmi  / EtP. Reprinting / publishing rights reserved by the author and/or EtP (PROJECT 365 public archives). Prior permission is required for reproduction / re-publishing for non-commercial public use and research. For more information contact EtP at {0}4175 237405 / {0}94879 56405 / project365@etpindia.org / FACEBOOK – Project 365

Close Encounters – ‘Lo-Fi Photo Series’

Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director's anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives
Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director’s anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives
Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director's anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives
Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director’s anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives
Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director's anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives
Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director’s anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives

These smart phone photographs are made by photographer and Project 365 Director Abul Kalam Azad as connecting anecdotes for project 365 that creates and preserves photographic visuals of the fast changing culture and lifestyle of a South Indian Tamil town Tiruvannamalai. He has been creating several hundred images portraying the life and culture of this ancient town and Project 365 public photo archives will be locally preserving these images for public access and research.

We belong to the generation that has been photographed intensely. However, very few of these photographs will be preserved. There is a greater chance that only one or two out of one lakh photographs will reach the print form. Since the advent of digital technology, and its fast growth, we have lost most of our images that are being safely stored away in the long forgotten floppy discs, CD drives, old mobile phones, cameras etc., Photography, which is essentially a print, has given away its traditional alchemical quality / longevity and has become mere virtual intangible screen images. The danger is, in an instant, these images can be lost forever to our future generations.

Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director's anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives
Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director’s anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives
Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director's anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives
Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director’s anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives
Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director's anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives
Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director’s anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives
Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director's anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives
Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director’s anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives
Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director's anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives
Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director’s anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives
Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director's anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives
Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director’s anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives
Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director's anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives
Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director’s anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives
Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director's anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives
Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director’s anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives

We also belong to the generation that is fast changing and growing exponentially. Our way of life, lifestyle, beliefs and practices are changing. The potential of this photographic medium is so high to document these paradigm shift moment. Even though several thousand photographs are being taken everyday by almost everybody, only a very few provide thoughtful and focused efforts to preserve these photographs like yesteryear epigraphical documentation or other iconographic motifs for the benefit of our future generations. EtP (Ekalokam Trust for Photography) is dedicated to collectively create and preserve photographic visuals of these sublime images. That is the intent behind Project 365 and to achieve that, EtP has been properly archiving these smart phone and other lo-fi photographs. These photographs may not be printable in larger formats… may not be commercially viable… but they serve well the intended purpose – a visual document of ordinary people and their everyday life in an ancient town.

The myopic eye of smart phone demands that the photographer has to be within a certain “intimate” distance to take a photograph. There has to be a certain connection between the one who is being photographed and the photographer himself… using a smart phone to create portraits of people means, the photographer is not a mere witness The one who is photographed often looks straight into the camera and thus the photographer.. there is an unspoken conversation that connects these two, both becoming intensely present !!!

And, this intimate presence is what a spectator relates…

Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director's anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives
Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director’s anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives
Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director's anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives
Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director’s anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives
Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director's anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives
Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director’s anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives
Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director's anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives
Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director’s anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives
Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director's anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives
Smart phone photography (C) Abul Kalam Azad / Director’s anecdote / Project 365 public photo archives

(to be continued)

Disclaimer: All rights reserved. All the images published in this blog is copyrighted property of the author and belongs to PROJECT 365 PUBLIC ARCHIVES. Text by Tulsi Swarna Lakshmi  / EtP. Reprinting / publishing rights reserved by the author and EtP (PROJECT 365 public archives). Prior permission is required for reproduction / re-publishing. For more information about Project 365, contact EtP at {0}4175 237405 / {0}94879 56405 / project365@etpindia.org / FACEBOOK – Project 365